Two Parts Make A Whole: A Song For Us by Teresa Mummert

Synopsis

In this highly anticipated follow-up to White Trash Damaged, Cass and Tucker have finally found their happily ever after, but can Eric, the band’s brooding drummer, ever let go of his past and find love? 

From a small-town boy with fantasies of superstardom to rock star on tour with the suddenly famous band Damaged, Eric’s life has not been an easy journey. Now he struggles to let go of his past of physical abuse, a past that still haunts him. His anger is causing him to spiral out of control and he risks losing everything he has worked so hard for.

Only one person has ever gotten him to open up about his past: Sarah, the lead singer of Filth, the opening act on their first national tour—a fellow rocker with a confident façade that masks her own painful secrets. But their bands’ rocky past and Sarah’s tumultuous relationship with her bandmate and boyfriend Derek force her to keep Eric at a distance. As their friendship begins to grow into something more, Eric has to find a way to let go of his tortured past, or it could jeopardize his only chance for a happy future…

Casey’s Thoughts <3<3<3<3<3

A Song For Us isn’t a story about Tucker and Cass instead it’s about Eric and Sarah. What happens when Sarah strolls back into Eric’s life with Derek, the ass hat boyfriend along side? We all know that Sarah and Eric are friends, confide in each other, but what happens when the true feeling consume each of them in their own way?

We all have a past and some are worse than others. Eric has a past to over come along with Sarah doing the same. Eric tries to be the bigger person and do what he believes is right for Sarah.

Sarah is drowning in the present and past, but is she willing to step up and announce her feelings to her future?

A Song For Us is a story of love, pain, heartbreak, confronting your past, and moving forward. This book will make you fall for Sarah and Eric and the path each are currently on. The question is will their paths cross or will they never intersect?

About the Author

Teresa Mummert

“I was a Russian spy at the ripe age of thirteen, given my uncanny ability to tell if someone was lying ( I also read fortunes on the weekends). By sixteen I had become too much of a handful for the Lethal Intelligence Ensemble (L.I.E.). I was quickly exiled to the south of France where I worked with wayward elephants in the Circus of Roaming Animals and People (C.R.A.P.). I was able to make ends meet by selling my organs on the black market for pocket change and beer money. At the age of twenty three I decided to expand my horizons and become a blackjack dealer in Ireland. I loved the family atmosphere at Barney’s Underground Liquor Lounge (B.U.L.L.). People couldn’t resist the allure of Liquor up front and poker in the rear. Eventually I became tired of the rear and headed off to the United States to try my hand at tall tales. That is what brings us here today. If you have a moment I’d like to tell you a story.

(This bio is not to be taken seriously under any circumstance.)

Teresa Mummert is an army wife and mother whose passion in life is writing. She is the author of the New York Times and USA Todaybestselling novels White Trash Beautiful and Suicide Note. Born in Pennsylvania, she lived a small town life before following her husband’s military career to Louisiana and Georgia. Check out her website for samples and updates! TeresaMummert.com”

Social Media Links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TeresaMummert

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TeresaMummert

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5214793.Teresa_Mummert

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Teresa-Mummert/e/B005ZSVJMA/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1386381916&sr=8-2-ent

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s